In both the military and commercial spheres, individuals are granted varying levels of personal autonomy, according to ability and character. Obviously both require constant learning. By contrast, students at K-12 are hierarchically flat and undifferentiated. The obvious explanation is that militaries and business are both exposed to direct performance feedback in the form of bullets and bankruptcy, whereas schools… aren’t.

Parents are typically too overwhelmed by the information necessary to manage their own lives, to also manage their children’s education. So they delegate and relegate.

School is bad due to perverse incentives, as I briefly sketched. The question is how to fix it. Give me Textmind as a kid, and I no longer need school, which was a waste of my time. Give my parents Textmind, and they’ll have the bandwidth to provide pedagogical guidance, for a process tailored to each of their children’s needs. Institutions might be a part of that process, but they would bring much more applied pedagogical intelligence to bear on the individual student, who would himself be more intelligent.

Without addressing the info overwhelm problem, I don’t think the school problem can be fixed. High-performance families can homeschool or unschool, but they’ll remain a minority engaged in an time-expensive hobby. Competing with institutions is hard.

At the other end of the bell curve, there are those families who benefit most from an authoritarian approach, same as in business and military. Therefore school will always exist for them. The authoritarian approach has become unfashionable with political correctness, and as a result those who would benefit from it experience more negative life outcomes.

The fundamental problem is making the shift from the ancestral environment, for which we are evolutionarily adapted, to the information economy, for which we are not. We therefore require technological aids such as treadmill desks to repurpose brains designed for arboreal hunter gathering. Textmind is such a tool.