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2021-06-10 | Fierce Nerds | earplugs | replicability crisis | COVID19: masks; lab leak racist? | desktop wars | expat Singapore | Icahn's crypto | birth | autism | flouride good | ego ~ violence | ad spies | $QL | shy UFOs | Textmind | crime hosts

Table of Contents

  1. About: Objective Contrarian news
    1. Content
    2. Format
  2. brain sees tools as extension of body
  3. China increases spending 500% to influence America (axios.com) | HN@ | jingoistic hacks
  4. Fierce Nerds | PGraham
  5. A new book aims to blow up some widely held assumptions about the best founding teams | TechCrunch | Ali Tamaseb | “Super Founders: What Data Reveals About Billion-Dollar Startups.” | positive for me
  6. Born to be Managers? | Marginal REVOLUT | risk takers become managers
  7. ear plugs beat noise-cancelling headphones | bone-conduction headphones for exercise | HN
  8. masks | cloth | improve exposure probability and dosage | HN
  9. masks effective vs COVID19 | HN@multiple
  10. nonreplicable studies cited in Google Scholar 153x more often than replicable ones | VP@
  11. A new replication crisis: Research that is less likely to be true is cited more (ucsd.edu) | HN commenters | bad scientists corrupt peer review | publish or perish spam
  12. COVID19 causes organ damage | more important than death toll | HN@thowaway959125
  13. COVID19 | wuhan lab | 3 sick staff | normal flu season | HN@humanistbot
  14. Microsoft merited its success | desktop: Apple > Linux | AC@TommyEagan
  15. Linux desktop poor quality | no unified vision | Linux is for servers | AC@TommyEagan
  16. Living in Singapore: An Expat Guide | nomadcapitalist.com
  17. Collusion rings threaten the integrity of computer science research (acm.org) | HN | blatant Chinese plagiaristic collusion
  18. "Crypto Is Here To Stay": Carl Icahn Wants Up To $1.5 Billion In Crypto Exposure, Prefers Ethereum | ZeroHedge News
  19. Half of All US Adults Are Now Fully Vaccinated Against COVID-19 | Slashdot
  20. Mild cases of COVID-19 leave people with long-term antibody protection against reinfection.
  21. Immediate skin-to-skin contact with unstable newborns improves survival chances (medlifestyle.news) | HN | kangaroo care a Nordic standard | no early contact = disinterested in attachment | birth a mystery
  22. Autism as a disorder of high intelligence | Aeoli | study: Bernard Crespi
  23. foam floor "bed" best
  24. Fluoride, good for your teeth, not bad for your brain | Clear Language,
  25. a Chinese billionaire dies every 40 days | 72 unnatural deaths over 8 years | Twitter@RHenderson
  26. narcissism always correlates with aggression | delusion bubble
  27. saw ads for mom's toothpaste | advertiser triangulation sophisticated | Twitter@Robert G. Reeve
  28. After a week at my mom’s house I'm getting ads for her toothpaste brand (twitter.com/robertgreeve) | HN | advertisers know phone's crdit card, health, politics, friends
  29. US Mint Delays Silver Shipments Due To "Global Silver Shortage" | USD collapse?
  30. Drunk Post: Things I've learned as a Sr Engineer | SQL most lucrative language
  31. what are the UFOs afraid of, that keeps them shy? | unknown Overwatcher
  32. viral dose does matter, therefore cloth masks work | mouse lethal virii dose
  33. paradox of genius: | neuro-atypical to solve problem | mass acceptance to profit | Gab@TrevorGoodchild
  34. Naked Dating | VH1 | slimy contract | violated woman
  35. usenet has all the media | how to
  36. answering HN re lab leak "racist"
    1. "lab leak" theory considered racist because implied CCP malice | HN
    2. I reply | CCP bioattack not racist
    3. second draft
  37. Majority Of Americans Believe COVID Came From Wuhan Lab; A Quarter Believe It Was "Released On Purpose", New Poll Finds | ZeroHedge News
  38. Putin Charges US With Using Dollar To Wage "Economic & Political War" | ZeroHedge News
  39. [Infographics] Two of the most useful principal component analyses (PCAs) worth saving | thuletide.wordpress.com
  40. answering Textmind questions
  41. What is far deadlier than most people realize? [serious] | reddit | leg blood clots | weirs
  42. US senate envoy arrives in Taiwan | Reddit | [2021-06-08 Tue]
  43. UFOs | jackals skulking | seeking our legal consent
  44. answering textmind questions
    1. 1st round
    2. he wrote
    3. my reply
  45. Publish and Perish (erikhoel.substack.com) | HN@ | careerist scientistry auto-corrupted
  46. answering cyberthal questions on discord
    1. he wrote
    2. my reply
  47. Fauci emails reveal a lot of tin-hat conspiracies weren’t so debunked after all | axisofeasy.com | good overview
  48. Superhistory, Not Superintelligence | Artificial Intelligence is really Artificial Time | Venkatesh Rao | my notes
    1. my notes
  49. why UFOs making contact | legal consent
  50. WATCH: Explosive, Unearthed Video Shows Peter Daszak Describing ‘Chinese Colleagues’ Developing ‘Killer’ Coronaviruses. | thenationalpulse.com
  51. HN | VPNs log | jurisdictional arbitrage
  52. org-super-links | textmind candidate | defer
  53. Meet the World’s Biggest ‘Bulletproof’ Hoster | krebsonsecurity.com | Yalishanda, Ukrainian cybercriminal | USSR + China harbors darkweb

About: Objective Contrarian news

Content

These are my notes, shared.

To avoid redundancy, I often skip stories already known and accepted by Hacker News. Instead I focus on what adds contrarian value to the consensus.

Format

Long articles are truncated at points marked by ellipses, to comply with copyright law. Follow the link to continue reading.

Only article plaintext is copied. Anything else, such as images and video, is lost.

Headings use | as a divider rather than complete sentences with punctuation. This shortens without sacrificing specificity. Imitate this style in your own notes. Learn more about Cyborganize here.

brain sees tools as extension of body

A fascinating new study was published a few weeks ago showing how our brain interprets tools literally as an extension of our body.

"Instead, our results show that typicality representations for tool grasping are automatically evoked in visual regions specialised for representing the human hand, the brain’s primary tool for interacting with the world… Finding a specificity for typical tool grasping in hand-, rather than tool-, selective regions challenges the long-standing assumption that activation for viewing tool images reflects sensorimotor processing linked to tool manipulation."

Hand-selective visual regions represent how to grasp 3D tools: brain decoding during real actions
https://www.jneurosci.org/content/early/2021/04/30/JNEUROSCI.0083-21.2021
[2021-05-18 Tue 13:42]

China increases spending 500% to influence America (axios.com) | HN@ | jingoistic hacks

China increases spending 500% to influence America (axios.com)
120 points by throwkeep 13 hours ago | hide | past | favorite | 122 comments
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=27185898

scarmig 12 hours ago [–]

Chinese propaganda is just so… Tone deaf. Give me a couple million dollars and a couple interns and I'm pretty sure I could do better than any of its existing organs. This isn't a particularly high bar: you could probably do better just by doing nothing.

Russian propagandists generally understood the West and how to undermine it. CCP propagandists do not. Jingoistic crimestop prevents them from reading or understanding the West's criticism of the CCP and its propaganda. Theirs is an echo chamber of power, and thus their rhetoric is memetically weak. They are not part of the West's intellectual tradition.

Nonetheless, simple bribery works wonders.
[2021-05-18 Tue 19:02]

Fierce Nerds | PGraham

Fierce Nerds
May 2021

Most people think of nerds as quiet, diffident people. In ordinary social situations they are — as quiet and diffident as the star quarterback would be if he found himself in the middle of a physics symposium. And for the same reason: they are fish out of water. But the apparent diffidence of nerds is an illusion due to the fact that when non-nerds observe them, it's usually in ordinary social situations. In fact some nerds are quite fierce.

The fierce nerds are a small but interesting group. They are as a rule extremely competitive — more competitive, I'd say, than highly competitive non-nerds. Competition is more personal for them. Partly perhaps because they're not emotionally mature enough to distance themselves from it, but also because there's less randomness in the kinds of competition they engage in, and they are thus more justified in taking the results personally.

If you do choose the ambitious route, you'll have a tailwind behind you. There has never been a better time to be a nerd. In the past century we've seen a continuous transfer of power from dealmakers to technicians — from the charismatic to the competent — and I don't see anything on the horizon that will end it. At least not till the nerds end it themselves by bringing about the singularity.

http://paulgraham.com/fn.html
[2021-05-19 Wed 11:02]

A new book aims to blow up some widely held assumptions about the best founding teams | TechCrunch | Ali Tamaseb | “Super Founders: What Data Reveals About Billion-Dollar Startups.” | positive for me

TechCrunch [] A new book aims to blow up some widely held assumptions about the best founding teams

There’s a lot of how-to guidance out there when it comes to starting a company, and much of it has reinforced certain beliefs, including that solo founders
don’t get very far on their own, that the most successful founders attend a small circle of top schools and that the best companies are created by people who
launched them to solve a personal problem into which they had a particular insight.

Ali Tamaseb — who studied biomedical engineering at Imperial College London, attended business school at Stanford and founded a wearable tech startup
before joining the venture firm DCVC as an investor in 2018 — says that lot of that guidance is, well, misguided. Tamaseb says he knows this because over
the past four years, to improve his own decision-making, he amassed more than 30,000 data points about so-called “super founders,” from their age when
their breakout company was founded to how many competitors they faced from the outset; in doing so, he says, he wound up discovering that much of
what is espoused in startup circles is off the mark.

TC: What did your research tell you about funding and its impacts? We’re seeing companies raise bigger rounds faster than ever before, including from Tiger
Global.

AT: I don’t specifically have any brilliant thoughts on Tiger or anyone else, but these unicorns that I studied — even in their seed round and Series A rounds,
they had raised two to three times larger rounds than the companies that did not become billion-dollar companies. In fact, 92% of these billion-dollar
companies were venture-backed and they raised a lot of money, which allowed them to attract better talent and go to market faster. Even from the early
stage, this kingmaker strategy kind of works.

[2021-05-19 Wed 11:34]

Born to be Managers? | Marginal REVOLUT | risk takers become managers

Marginal REVOLUT [] Born to be Managers?

The paper’s subtitle is “Genetic Links between Risk-Taking and the Likelihood of Holding Managerial Positions.” It is hard for me to verify or assess this
kind of result, but I pass it along for its interest:

Do genes determine who will become managers? Using the UK Biobank data, we study the phenotypic and genetic correlations between the likelihood
of holding managerial positions and physical, cognitive, and mental health traits (n = 297,591). Among all traits we examine, general risk tolerance and
risky behaviors (e.g., automobile speeding and the number of sexual partners) have the strongest phenotypic and genetic correlations with holding
managerial positions. For example, the genetic correlation between automobile speeding and being managers is 0.39 (P = 3.94E-16). Additionally, the
genetic correlations between risk-taking traits and being managers are stronger for females. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) shows holding
managerial positions is associated with rs7035099 (ZNF618, 9q32), which has been linked to risk tolerance and adventurousness. Overall, our results
suggest individuals with risk-taking-related genes are more likely to become managers. To the best of our knowledge, this paper is the first GWAS of the
genetic effects on leadership.

That is from a new paper by Jinjie Lin and Bingxin Zhao. Via a loyal MR reader.

The post Born to be Managers? appeared first on Marginal REVOLUTION.

[2021-05-20 Thu 16:20]

ear plugs beat noise-cancelling headphones | bone-conduction headphones for exercise | HN

HN:

Jakobeha 13 hours ago [–]

Material goods:
Ear plugs (silicone). Don't waste your money on noise-cancelling headphones, I have $200 ones and they don't compare to simple ear plugs. If you live in a moderately noisy area and you want peace and quiet, get them. They basically just make everything quiet. 24 from CVS = $10.
OpenMove by Aftershokz - Bone-conduction headphones. Perfect for running and just good for listening to music. They work, they're way easier to wear and more comfortable than earpods, I haven't had any issues since I got them about 8-months ago. Plus, you can wear them with earplugs for music + noise cancellation. $99

masks | cloth | improve exposure probability and dosage | HN

AstralStorm 6 hours ago [–]

As suspected, it's exactly a probability game. If there's few infectious particles sure to low concentrations (e.g. people distance or are outdoors), you would roll the 70% penetration chance fewer times, and result in very few particles reaching deeper into lungs too as the velocities are reduced.
When very close to an active particle source, you'd roll the conditional probability dice many more times.
The critical number is the base infectivity or viability. (CFU essentially) It is expected that sub-viable numbers might even work as a kind of vaccination if people isolate long enough. (stay at home for prolonged time without contact - scale of days at least)
reply

epivosism 6 hours ago [–]

Yes. Crazy how hard it has been for people to get this:
Imagine a bulletproof vest with three larger-than-bullet-sized holes in it. Say you know someone is going to shoot ten bullets at you - would you not wear the vest because "the attack vector can fit through the pores"?
The point is people treat this as a binary 'safe' / 'not safe' switch, when actually risk is related to the distribution of exposure to dosage.

[2021-05-21 Fri 12:17]

masks effective vs COVID19 | HN@multiple

awb 1 day ago [–]

I wonder how much super spreaders affect outbreaks.
Let’s say LA had 50 super spreaders vs. 25 in SF. I’d expect LA to have more than 2x the cases because of the exponential spread of the virus.
And I think the idea behind masks was not that they’re a cure, but a 2nd best option if the best option of social distancing isn’t possible.
And even if they’re 30% effective, the idea is to get R (the number of subsequent people an infected person goes on to infect) to go down. Because a 30% reduction in transmission has a huge effect over time, even if it’s not perfect.

cr1895 17 hours ago [–]

Zeynep Tufecki described this phenomenon in the Atlantic, going into its overdispersed nature of spreading and how most infections don’t result in a spread to others, but some circumstances become super-spreading events with an outsize impact:
https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2020/09/k-overloo

froh 21 hours ago [–]

super spreaders and super spreader events are key to transmission, like indoor singing hallelujah or indoor family gatherings happy birthday granny or schooling, Kindergarden, you get the gist…
indoor and speaking/singing is the key combination for aerosol based transmission.

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=27226751&p=2
[2021-05-22 Sat 11:10]

rdmirza 4 hours ago [–]

I did not bother to read this thread in its entirety though I typically enjoy HN discussion.
Undoubtedly, masks of any quality work. Airborne viruses still exist in secretions (likely, in much higher concentrations). Secretions sometimes even carry living cells, would you imagine (in fact the #1 cause of sputum sample contamination for C&S; the bane of internists everywhere). High velocity events certainly increase the environment-load of secretion and thereby virus.
You don't need evidence in all cases. Im sorry to say, to the otherwise curious-minded, this is one of those cases.

stretchwithme 1 day ago [–]

If high resolution video is to be believed, masks reduce how many particles get into the air when we cough, sneeze or talk.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2azcn7MqOU

davidhyde 1 day ago [–]

For those of you who haven’t seen the slowmoguys video about talking with and without a mask this is good:
https://youtu.be/gZ66wJFD3bs
If you want to skip the technical lighting bits then jump to the 4 minute mark. It’s difficult to argue against footage like that and it makes you wonder why some people take off their masks to talk.

[2021-05-22 Sat 11:12]

tripletao 1 day ago [–]

The Vietnamese study found that cloth masks increased risk compared to medical masks, not compared to no mask. Confusingly, their control group also wore masks, just in fewer situations:

Hospital wards were randomised to: medical masks, cloth masks or a control group (usual practice, which included mask wearing).
The first paper doesn't say what kind of mask the control participants wore, but a subsequent paper says only 38/458 control participants wore a cloth mask. I think the implication is that the rest wore medical masks, though neither paper ever says explicitly.
https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/10/9/e042045
That subsequent paper is a subgroup analysis that should be treated with some care, but found comparable performance between medical masks and cloth masks washed in the hospital laundry. That suggests the problem was inadequate hand-washing, not the masks themselves.
There is zero evidence that masks increase incidence of disease compared to no mask. RCTs of mask use in public (e.g., DANMASK-19 and earlier flu studies) suggest that the benefit of the mask to the wearer–excluding the benefit of the mask to others nearby from source control–is less than a 50% reduction in disease, with a 95% confidence interval centered somewhere around 20% but including zero. The RCT evidence says nothing beyond that.
Public health authorities have indeed spoken with unjustified confidence as to the efficacy of masks. You're doing the same thing here in the opposite direction, though. Given the information above, can you correct your comment?

[2021-05-22 Sat 11:14]

nonreplicable studies cited in Google Scholar 153x more often than replicable ones | VP@

Scientistry exacerbates bad scientody

The reproducibility crisis in science, which is the fact that most peer-reviewed studies published in the most-reputable science journals cannot be replicated, is being significantly exacerbated by the fact that the nonreplicable studies are cited far more often than the replicable ones:

Papers in leading psychology, economic and science journals that fail to replicate and therefore are less likely to be true are often the most cited papers in academic research, according to a new study by the University of California San Diego’s Rady School of Management.

Published in Science Advances, the paper explores the ongoing “replication crisis” in which researchers have discovered that many findings in the fields of social sciences and medicine don’t hold up when other researchers try to repeat the experiments.

The paper reveals that findings from studies that cannot be verified when the experiments are repeated have a bigger influence over time. The unreliable research tends to be cited as if the results were true long after the publication failed to replicate.

“We also know that experts can predict well which papers will be replicated,” write the authors Marta Serra-Garcia, assistant professor of economics and strategy at the Rady School and Uri Gneezy, professor of behavioral economics also at the Rady School. “Given this prediction, we ask ‘why are non-replicable papers accepted for publication in the first place?’”

The link between interesting findings and nonreplicable research also can explain why it is cited at a much higher rate—the authors found that papers that successfully replicate are cited 153 times less than those that failed.

“Interesting or appealing findings are also covered more by media or shared on platforms like Twitter, generating a lot of attention, but that does not make them true,” Gneezy said.

http://voxday.blogspot.com/2021/05/scientistry-exacerbates-bad-scientody.html

Only one in eight papers that quoted a study after it could not be reproduced mentioned that fact. It's almost as if reality doesn't matter.

Not to be too clever about it, but this is an appealing and interesting finding. Somehow I doubt it will be widely cited in Google Scholar. Still, perhaps we should wait for replication on the 153x citation figure. Maybe difficulty of conducting a proper experiment is a confounding variable. Things that are harder to prove are more interesting, but false things are the hardest to prove.
[2021-05-22 Sat 19:27]

A new replication crisis: Research that is less likely to be true is cited more (ucsd.edu) | HN commenters | bad scientists corrupt peer review | publish or perish spam

A new replication crisis: Research that is less likely to be true is cited more (ucsd.edu)
561 points by hhs 1 day ago | hide | past | favorite | 301 comments
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=27241715

lasfter 1 day ago [–]

The issue is that the authors of bad papers still participate in the peer-review process. If they are the only expert reviewers and you do not pay proper respect to their work, they will squash your submission. To avoid this, papers can propagate mistakes for a long time.
Personally, I'm always very careful to cite and praise work by "competing" researchers even when that work has well-known errors, because I know that those researchers will review my paper and if there aren't other experts on the review committee the paper won't make it. I wish I didn't have to, but my supervisor wants to get tenured and I want to finish grad school, and for that we need to publish papers.
Lots of science is completely inaccessible for non-experts as a result of this sort of politics. There is no guarantee that the work you hear praised/cited in papers is actually any good; it may have been inserted just to appease someone.
I thought that this was something specific to my field, but apparently not. Leaves me very jaded about the scientific community.

qalmakka 23 hours ago [–]

I worked in the academic world for two years. What I saw was that lots of people are under a constant pressure to publish, and quantity is often put above quality.
I've seen papers without any sort of value or reason to exist being bruteforced through reviewing just to avoid some useless junk data of no value whatsoever being wasted, all to just add a line on someone's CV.
This is without saying that some Unis are packed of totally incompetent people that only got to advance their careers by always finding a way to piggyback on someone else's paper.
The worst thing I've seen is that reviewing papers is also often offloaded to newly graduated fellows, which are often instructed to be lenient when reviewing papers coming from "friendly universities".
The level of most papers I have had the disgrace to read is so bad it made me want to quit that world as soon as I could.
I got to the conclusion the whole system is basically a complex game of politics and strategy, fed by a loop in which bad research gets published on mediocre outlets, which then get a financial return by publishing them. This bad published research is then used to justify further money being spent on low quality rubbish work, and the cycle continues.
Sometimes you get to review papers that are so comically bad and low effort they almost feel insulting on a personal level.
For instance, I had to reject multiple papers not only due their complete lack of content, but also because their English was so horrendous they were basically unintelligible.

[2021-05-24 Mon 21:58]

COVID19 causes organ damage | more important than death toll | HN@thowaway959125

HN:

thowaway959125 4 hours ago [–]

There are numerous reasons why we need a proper investigation into this. If this came out of WIV, we need to determine exactly why these bat coronaviruses were being studied with regards to human ACE2.
This ACE2 binding is causing numerous issues, including damage to human heart, lung, kidney, and pancreatic cell death.
This is serious stuff. If anyone is looking at the "low" mortality rate, they are missing the big picture.
Role of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in COVID-19
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7356137/
The genetic structure of SARS‐CoV‐2 does not rule out a laboratory origin
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7744920/
SARS-CoV-2 infects human pancreatic β-cells and elicits β-cell impairment
https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(21)

[2021-05-24 Mon 13:18]

COVID19 | wuhan lab | 3 sick staff | normal flu season | HN@humanistbot

HN:

humanistbot 4 hours ago [–]

"with symptoms consistent with both COVID-19 and common seasonal illnesses"

So 3 staff had gotten sick that flu season. Staff who work with infectious diseases and probably get every cough and cold checked out just in case. Seems pretty baseline average to me.

[2021-05-24 Mon 13:18]

Microsoft merited its success | desktop: Apple > Linux | AC@TommyEagan

TommyEagan commented on News Briefs - 05/24/2021.

in response to Lowell Houser:

AC and I disagreed on this one a ways back. I always thought that there really was some truth to the Microsoft story regarding IBM licensing DOS from them just because honestly it makes sense because American corporations at the time were devoutly short sided and arrogant. Later I discovered that yes, Bill had help […]

Love you bro, but stay in your lane.
Your tech analysis is so insanely off base that I struggle to even know where to begin.

“Bill himself reps out as a very competent programmer, not an actor, who’s projects were always solid without being flashy,”
Simple. What code of Bill’s have you reviewed? None, exactly, because that rep is all second hand, the first thing to be manufactured.

“venture captial from Inq-U-tel”
It’s In-Q-Tel (CIA), and this is the first I’ve heard of this. This one wouldn’t surprise me.

“US government settling their antitrust lawsuit,”
Microsoft was already huge at this point. This didn’t give them their market share, they already had it.

“Microsoft Word as the standard document type across all government offices in America”
Have you used, literally any other product? Word dominated, perhaps because it had help, but most obviously because it was the best and had the right mix of features.

“Expect either Microsoft or Google will buy Canonical who distributes Ubuntu which is the most prevalent Linux distro”
It’s the Linux stuff where you go really far off the rails. Canonical is failing, Ubuntu is waning, and Microsoft has their own a kernel implementation for WSL2, so what the heck are you talking about? Google, Amazon, these are who you should be watching.

“As it stands, it won’t be long before MS and IBM basically control Linux outright“
Again, wtf? Red Hat has pretty tiny market share outside of US government, and that’s falling fast with the introduction of GovCloud and IBM’s fumbling of the CentOS fiasco. Amazon and google is who you should be watching, not has-Beens like MS and IBM. This conclusion alone tells me you have no idea about the current state of affairs.

“Digital Computer or Commodore had prevailed over Microsoft Linux never would have been more than Linus Torvalds little tinkering project.”
And what does name dropping comically irrelevant dinosaur IT companies have to do with anything? You act like the desktop is computing. The internet is where the real action is, and mainframes before that. Commodore never touched that market, and DEC couldn’t keep it.

“It’s possible the next version of Windows will basically be a proprietary desktop environment on top of a proprietary fork of the Linux kernel,”
To take a dev tool like WSL2 and extrapolate out that they are going to pull an Apple with that is just plain silly. MS prides themselves on not breaking comparability.
Look at the 20 year compatible nature of Win32. They never break old shit, that’s why corporations love MS.
OS X came from NextStep, which had a GUI and was Unix based. Apple just slapped their magic on it. Android is an interesting comparison, but see my comments on MS and compatible software above.
And third, you can’t legally have a proprietary fork of GPL3 code, because the license dictates that you must open source derivatives. (Is the kernel GPL3?)

And apple as a cult?
These “Apple is a cult!” Comments just scream “I have no taste and hate myself so much I’d subject myself to shitty computing experiences”

I’m tired of the Linux/MS naval gazing with Apple bashing. It’s tedious and unoriginal.
I use my MacOS terminal to SSH into a Linux dev desktop to control a build pipeline in the cloud that spans the globe several times a day. Get out of the 90s and obtain a clue my brother.

https://www.anonymousconservative.com/blog/news-briefs-05-24-2021/?replytocom=363995

Good points Tommy. Too rare around here.
[2021-05-25 Tue 17:22]

Linux desktop poor quality | no unified vision | Linux is for servers | AC@TommyEagan

AC@

TommyEagan commented on News Briefs - 05/24/2021.

The deeper problem is Linux nerds typically have zero taste. Look at your average developer.
The fact that you ever considered gnome or enlightenment good enough, or even close to good enough for mass market appeal, shows a lack of understanding of mass market appeal.

BSD desktop? Seriously? Compared with MacOS or even Windows 10, it’s ludicrous.

I tried running desktop Linux and it’s a slap dash mix of technologies, each with their own vision and interface model. No unification of thought or vision, no style guide, add on to that and the complexity is barely hidden. Try to install your favorite apps when they are distributed as a mix of snaps, flat packs, apks, and rpms.
It’s fucking retarded. And it remains that way because nobody has the power or influence to put their foot down and say “we are going to do this better”
Conical got the closest, but instead of embracing a company with vision, Linux nerds kneecapped them and held them back like lobsters in a bucket.
Desktop Linux users deserve the shit they use.

Linux on the server? Beautiful. On the desktop? Garbage.

[2021-05-26 Wed 10:16]

Living in Singapore: An Expat Guide | nomadcapitalist.com

Living in Singapore: An Expat Guide

Andrew HendersonAndrew Henderson is the world's most sought-after consultant on international tax planning, investment immigration, and global citizenship. He has personally lived this lifestyle for over a decade, and now works with seven- and eight-figure entrepreneurs and investors who want to "go where they're treated best".

The city-state of Singapore is a popular expat destination, with people from many different cultures now living in Singapore. The country has four official languages: Malay, English, Tamil, and Mandarin.

Singapore is known for being clean and safe. It boasts one of the freest economies in the world and has some of the most stable and safe banks.

There are many expats in Singapore due to the country’s popularity amongst global citizens. In the past, Singapore was known as the place to be for going offshore. Over the years, Singapore has grown and advanced, making it harder now to get residence than it was in the past. Still, it is possible to get Singapore residency and start enjoying all Singapore has to offer.

In this article, we’re going to go over everything Singapore expats need to know about living in Singapore, including when to be there, where to live, and what there is to do, as well as options for obtaining residence, and how to go about investing and banking.

What is the best time of year for living in Singapore?

Conclusion

Living in Singapore is a great option for expats. There is enough to do and see that you’ll never get bored as well as all the amenities required for you to live comfortably and successfully run a profitable business.

Singapore can also be a great option for protecting and diversifying your assets. You can provide yourself with a solid Plan B by banking in Singapore, acquiring Singaporean residence, and storing your gold in Singapore.

So this territorial tax country can provide both a low-tax and high-quality life.

https://nomadcapitalist.com/2021/05/26/singapore-expat-guide/
[2021-05-27 Thu 14:28]

Collusion rings threaten the integrity of computer science research (acm.org) | HN | blatant Chinese plagiaristic collusion

Collusion rings threaten the integrity of computer science research (acm.org)
423 points by djoldman 8 hours ago | hide | past | favorite | 226 comments
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=27295906

ravel-bar-foo 4 hours ago [–]

Sometimes the collusion is blatantly obvious.
Back in grad school a colleague of mine spent nine months on an experiment in a new field and submitted it as a paper to a quality journal. Six months later, the paper was rejected for lack of novelty: One of the reviewers had found a paper with a figure-by-figure duplication of the same experiment – published on arXiv a week before the rejection decision. Both the managing editor and the author on the arXiv paper were from Chinese universities.
We wrote a rebuttal and submitted a complaint to the journal editor, but no justice was forthcoming. My colleage switched research directions to avoid the collusion and now takes pains not to submit papers without a coauthor who has enough clout in the field to deter blatant research theft. He also avoids dealing with editors from institutions in China.
He ended up graduating two years later than planned.

[2021-05-27 Thu 14:40]

"Crypto Is Here To Stay": Carl Icahn Wants Up To $1.5 Billion In Crypto Exposure, Prefers Ethereum | ZeroHedge News

ZeroHedge News [] "Crypto Is Here To Stay": Carl Icahn Wants Up To $1.5 Billion In Crypto Exposure, Prefers Ethereum

"Crypto Is Here To Stay": Carl Icahn Wants Up To $1.5 Billion In Crypto Exposure, Prefers Ethereum

With the likes of JPMorgan and Goldman jumping on the crypto train (favoring Ethereum over Bitcoin), yet another one of the world's most legendary
investors has became bullish on the space (adding to Loeb, Dalio and Druckenmiller, while Munger and his Omaha homie never will).

On Thursday, Carl Icahn told Bloomberg Markets' Taylor Riggs that while he doesn't own any digital currencies, his firm might get involved in a "relatively
big way," adding "Crypto is here to stay in one form or another."

"I think a natural manifestation of this inflation," said Dalio, adding "it's not yet there - but you had it in the 70s, and what's gonna happen if you have that is,
[people are] going be for looking for other stores of value outside the dollar. We are the resereve currency now, but if you keep printing money, it's not going
to be there."

When asked if he sees crypto as a store of value or more of a payment system, or the 'underlying blockchain' as is the case with Ethereum, Icahn replied:

"With Ethereum it's the underlying block chain. So, Ethereum has two things - you can use it as a payment system, you can use it as a store of value."

"So Ethereum and Bitcoin are different. Bitcoin to me is just a store of value."

https://www.zerohedge.com/crypto/crypto-here-stay-carl-icahn-may-take-relatively-big-stake-digital-currency-space-prefers-eth
[2021-05-27 Thu 14:51]

Half of All US Adults Are Now Fully Vaccinated Against COVID-19 | Slashdot

Slashdot [] Half of All US Adults Are Now Fully Vaccinated Against COVID-19

According to the Biden administration, half of the country's adults are now fully vaccinated against the coronavirus. NPR reports: "This is a major milestone in
our country's vaccination efforts," Andy Slavitt, a White House senior adviser on the COVID-19 response, said during a midday briefing. "The number was 1%
when we entered office Jan. 20." Nearly 130 million people age 18 and older have completed their vaccine regimens since the first doses were administered to
the public in December, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Another 70 million vaccine doses are currently in the distribution pipeline,
according to the agency. The U.S. is pushing to add millions more people to the ranks of the vaccinated. President Biden said this month that his new goal is to
administer at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine to 70% of U.S. adults by the Fourth of July. Nine states have given at least one vaccine shot to 70% of their
adult population, Slavitt said at Tuesday's briefing. Acknowledging the welcome return to a more normal life taking place around the country, he urged more
people to get the vaccine: "Unless you're vaccinated, you're at risk."

https://science.slashdot.org/story/21/05/26/2116242/half-of-all-us-adults-are-now-fully-vaccinated-against-covid-19
[2021-05-27 Thu 14:56]

Mild cases of COVID-19 leave people with long-term antibody protection against reinfection.

https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2021/05/25/coronavirus-mild-disease-long-lasting-antibodies-study/4941621947156/
[2021-05-27 Thu 15:06]

Immediate skin-to-skin contact with unstable newborns improves survival chances (medlifestyle.news) | HN | kangaroo care a Nordic standard | no early contact = disinterested in attachment | birth a mystery

Immediate skin-to-skin contact with unstable newborns improves survival chances (medlifestyle.news)
345 points by billyharris 1 day ago | hide | past | favorite | 194 comments
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=27300429

reacharavindh 19 hours ago [–]

Interesting to read this here. When my son was born (naturally, normal weight, fully healthy, and around expected due date), the midwife in Denmark had educated us about the Danish way of handling the birth - as soon as the baby comes out, they literally put the baby on mom’s chest, and leave us(parents, and baby) alone in the room for about an hour. Nothing needs to be done other than the baby being in care of it’s parents! They believed it helps the baby form a natural bond, but also acclimate to the outside world better than being whisked away and cleaned.
It was such a lovely experience. One of the many things I am thankful to Denmark for.
Several things that I was surprised to learn while going through this in DK.

  1. Childbirth is handled by midwives (Jordemothers) instead of doctors. Doctors are brought only when medication or any treatment is necessary.
  2. Child birth is considered a natural process and never treated/thought of as a sickness or medical condition. This is reflected in the whole process.
  3. The social healthcare system works great. It changed my perspective even more. Not having to think about hospital bills or insurance leaves us parents to enjoy the arrival of our little one.
  4. If everyone in the country, regardless of their current financial condition gets such an experience for their childbirth, I will gladly pay my taxes, and never complain. Healthcare should not be a business imho.

tenfourwookie 8 hours ago [–]

I received the opposite care. Was delivered by C-section, no contact with anyone while in incubation for several weeks. My mother would often tell the story of how she was unable to touch me for weeks after my birth.
45 years on and I haven’t a single bond, not with family, not with friends, not even with animals. Like a ghost floating through the world with no attachments and seemingly no compelling interest in them. Active avoidance is on point. But don't be sad for me. It's just the way I developed. And the lack of bonding, skin-to-skin contact with my mother is one possible reason.
They’ve tried to make a number of diagnoses fit, from autism to Schizoid Personality Disorder, Bipolar to Asperger's. Nothing. Nothing fits. There's nothing wrong with me except that I don't bond, at all.
One of the more disturbing experiences was watching what happened to chimpanzees when their mothers were taken away from them after birth (or were denied bonding entirely). They rock back and forth with anxiety; they grapple for the nearest comfy thing; more rocking. It was like watching myself. I'm typing this 45 years later holding a pillow for comfort. You'll rarely see me seated without one. I rock all the time. The pillow, the rocking. They fill a hole. It's protective somehow. I'm sure a shrink would say it reminds me of the womb that was stolen from me.
And I know I'll live the rest of my life like this, without bond, alone, and not really sad because of it, just totally missing what compels others towards their own kind, to bond.
So, yeah, more skin-to-skin sooner. No more lost people like me. Again: not sad about it, but life without others (and very much not wanting them) can be a severe challenge. You have only yourself.

dools 17 hours ago [–]

Lots to be learned about the microbiome, and how vaginal birth, breastfeeding and skin contact feeds that. The trend towards caesarian births and formula feeding countervenes this trend in health research.

ed25519FUUU 12 hours ago [–]

Everything about birth is incredible. For example it’s extremely common to defecate while giving birth. Oh no lots of germs and bad for baby right? Actually the exposure helps jumpstart the infants gut biome.
And in the 1930s they were trying to figure out why there’s a type of sugar in breast milk which the infant can’t digest. Why the weird evolutionary waste? It turns out these oligosaccharides are there to feed not the baby but the good bacteria in the gut. The incredible and amazing mother anatomy. Amazing in so many levels.
https://www.nature.com/articles/d42473-018-00007-1

[2021-05-28 Fri 17:18]

Autism as a disorder of high intelligence | Aeoli | study: Bernard Crespi

Autism as a disorder of high intelligence
Posted on May 29, 2021 by Aeoli Pera

Dutton mentions this often on his show but here’s a reference.

Autism As a Disorder of High Intelligence

A suite of recent studies has reported positive genetic correlations between autism risk and measures of mental ability. These findings indicate that alleles for autism overlap broadly with alleles for high intelligence, which appears paradoxical given that autism is characterized, overall, by below-average IQ. This paradox can be resolved under the hypothesis that autism etiology commonly involves enhanced, but imbalanced, components of intelligence. This hypothesis is supported by convergent evidence showing that autism and high IQ share a diverse set of convergent correlates, including large brain size, fast brain growth, increased sensory and visual-spatial abilities, enhanced synaptic functions, increased attentional focus, high socioeconomic status, more deliberative decision-making, profession and occupational interests in engineering and physical sciences, and high levels of positive assortative mating. These findings help to provide an evolutionary basis to understanding autism risk as underlain in part by dysregulation of intelligence, a core human-specific adaptation. In turn, integration of studies on intelligence with studies of autism should provide novel insights into the neurological and genetic causes of high mental abilities, with important implications for cognitive enhancement, artificial intelligence, the relationship of autism with schizophrenia, and the treatment of both autism and intellectual disability.

-Bernard Crespi

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnins.2016.00300/full?curator=MediaREDEF
I’ve chosen to remember this as an extreme form of the differentiation hypothesis. If you put two parents together with unbalanced IQ profiles, they have a higher risk of a child with an extremely unbalanced IQ profile, and in general people with higher IQs have more unbalanced IQ profiles.

This isn’t intended as an explanation of the study, it’s just a mnemonic.

https://aeolipera.wordpress.com/2021/05/29/autism-as-a-disorder-of-high-intelligence/
[2021-05-30 Sun 09:41]

foam floor "bed" best

giardini 23 minutes ago [–]

Best bed I've slept in was also the least expensive: a simple 10" foam pad cut to king-size bed dimensions. I put it on the floor and fitted it with king-size bedsheets. Most any pillow works for me.

[2021-05-30 Sun 14:26]

Fluoride, good for your teeth, not bad for your brain | Clear Language,

Clear Language, [] Fluoride, good for your teeth, not bad for your brain
https://emilkirkegaard.dk/en/2021/05/fluoride-good-for-your-teeth-not-bad-for-your-brain/

Definitive.
[2021-05-30 Sun 14:29]

a Chinese billionaire dies every 40 days | 72 unnatural deaths over 8 years | Twitter@RHenderson

"a Chinese billionaire dies every 40 days…unnatural deaths have taken the lives of 72 mainland billionaires over the past 8 years…15 were murdered, 17
committed suicide, 7 died from accidents and 19 from illness. 14 were executed. (Welcome to China.)" https://t.co/dgDn3QnDIz

— Rob Henderson (@robkhenderson) May 28, 2021

[2021-05-30 Sun 14:45]

narcissism always correlates with aggression | delusion bubble

r/science · Posted by u/Wagamaga 19h ago

According to a thorough analysis of 437 studies on narcissism around the world, there appears to be a strong correlation between narcissism and aggression — regardless of gender, age, and country of residence. Even narcissism "within what is considered a normal range" is linked to aggression.
https://www.reddit.com/r/science/comments/nnl365/according_to_a_thorough_analysis_of_437_studies/
[2021-05-31 Mon 11:13]

basharspeaks
1 day ago

To me the mark of a narcissist is they don't listen, and they constantly misremember and make things up, to a degree that they seem almost like they have dementia. If you are in a civilized setting where aggression is not socially acceptable, and not in a close relationship with the narcissist you are unlikely to see unusual amounts of aggression.

[2021-05-31 Mon 11:17]

saw ads for mom's toothpaste | advertiser triangulation sophisticated | Twitter@Robert G. Reeve

A readable Thread by @RobertGReeve Says The internet is never going to be t
Robert G. Reeve

I'm back from a week at my mom's house and now I'm getting ads for her toothpaste brand, the brand I've been putting in my mouth for a week. We never talked about this brand or googled it or anything like that. As a privacy tech worker, let me explain why this is happening. 🧵

First of all, your social media apps are not listening to you. This is a conspiracy theory. It's been debunked over and over again. But frankly they don't need to because everything else you give them unthinkingly is way cheaper and way more powerful.

Your apps collect a ton of data from your phone. Your unique device ID. Your location. Your demographics. Weknowdis. Data aggregators pay to pull in data from EVERYWHERE. When I use my discount card at the grocery store? Every purchase? That's a dataset for sale.

They can match my Harris Teeter purchases to my Twitter account because I gave both those companies my email address and phone number and I agreed to all that data-sharing when I accepted those terms of service and the privacy policy.

Here's where it gets truly nuts, though. If my phone is regularly in the same GPS location as another phone, they take note of that. They start reconstructing the web of people I'm in regular contact with.

The advertisers can cross-reference my interests and browsing history and purchase history to those around me. It starts showing ME different ads based on the people AROUND me. Family. Friends. Coworkers.

It will serve me ads for things I DON'T WANT, but it knows someone I'm in regular contact with might want. To subliminally get me to start a conversation about, I don't know, fucking toothpaste. It never needed to listen to me for this. It's just comparing aggregated metadata.

https://unrollthread.com/t/1397032784703655938/
[2021-05-31 Mon 12:01]

After a week at my mom’s house I'm getting ads for her toothpaste brand (twitter.com/robertgreeve) | HN | advertisers know phone's crdit card, health, politics, friends

After a week at my mom’s house I'm getting ads for her toothpaste brand (twitter.com/robertgreeve)
333 points by deadcoder0904 16 hours ago | hide | past | favorite | 235 comments
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=27332506

titzer 10 hours ago [–]

What this person mentions is really just the tip of the iceberg. They link credit cards to phones because GPS coordinates and WiFi networks nail down your address, which they cross-reference with the billing address of credit cards.
They know who are you sleeping with, or if you aren't sleeping with anyone. They know your age and all the insecurities you have about your body, not to mention your health problems and every embarrassing fact about you. They know where you've been, where you're planning on going, and your political preferences. They know if you've donated to political parties, attended political rallies, if you voted, where, and when. And they know all your friends.
And we just let them do this. As tech people, we built this. And all the along the way we told ourselves it was fine, because it was very lucrative for the entire ad tech/fintech/startup ecosystem, and us personally.

[2021-05-31 Mon 12:27]

US Mint Delays Silver Shipments Due To "Global Silver Shortage" | USD collapse?

https://www.zerohedge.com/commodities/us-mint-delays-silver-shipments-due-global-silver-shortage

Dollar failure imminent?
[2021-05-31 Mon 12:01]

Drunk Post: Things I've learned as a Sr Engineer | SQL most lucrative language

Drunk Post: Things I've learned as a Sr Engineer
https://old.reddit.com/r/ExperiencedDevs/comments/nmodyl/drunk_post_things_ive_learned_as_a_sr_engineer/

For beginners, the most lucrative programming language to learn is SQL. Fuck all other languages. If you know SQL and nothing else, you can make bank. Payroll specialtist? Maybe 50k. Payroll specialist who knows SQL? 90k. Average joe with organizational skills at big corp? $40k. Average joe with organization skills AND sql? Call yourself a PM and earn $150k.

This supports my intuition that Dbmind is the right next step for my personal Cyborganize development.

what are the UFOs afraid of, that keeps them shy? | unknown Overwatcher

The real question is, what are the UFOs afraid of that keeps them at the fringes, out of sight? Because it clearly isn't human military power. And they aren't afraid that our broadcasting into space will attract an attack on Earth, either, or they would flee the target zone. So they are afraid of something that already knows about us and them, and will retaliate if the UFOs engage us too aggressively. Given the absence of UFO activity in space so far, this unknown Overwatcher may be restricting the UFOs to Earth. The UFOs may not even be extra-solar in origin, but instead the defeated remnant of a local destroyed civilization. Maybe Mars has little water because it was harvested and split for hydrogen fusion.
[2021-05-30 Sun 08:44]

viral dose does matter, therefore cloth masks work | mouse lethal virii dose

Mouse Adapted SARS-CoV-2 protects animals from lethal SARS-CoV challenge
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8109199/

CMA3p20 infected and control mice were subsequently challenged with a lethal dose of mouse-adapted SARS-CoV (104 PFU)17

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virus_quantification#Plaque_assay

Proof that viral dose does matter – there is a lethal dose! Thus cloth masks work by reducing dose, not filtering all particles.

Science is reliable when it becomes engineering. In the lab, virii must be shotgunned onto cells to achieve infection. That's engineering.

It's common sense. The immune system vs virii is a war. In war, the objective is to be firstest with the mostest.

paradox of genius: | neuro-atypical to solve problem | mass acceptance to profit | Gab@TrevorGoodchild

Trevor Goodchild
@TrevorGoodchild
2m

@kingofallnads @AndrewJames It's the paradox of the genius. You need to be significantly neuro-atypical (euphemism for antisocial/geek/asshole) to solve a problem with a completely different tack from the way millions have attempted before . . . But you need mass societal awareness and acceptance for your accomplishment to become widespread. Otherwise you get credit as a footnote in a century from your death (see: Ignatz Semmelweiss)

[2021-06-03 Thu 02:03]

Naked Dating | VH1 | slimy contract | violated woman

ThorsHammer0999
2 hours ago

Not my story but there was an article I read a while ago about a show called Dating Naked on VH1 and how they got sued by a woman for the stuff happening behind the camera.
She was single when she applied for a nameless dating show slated to be on VH1. They knew it was going to be a dating show but the didn't know what the premise would be yet as production was under other companies . They selected her and she had to sign a contract stipulating certain things she would do with her selected partner for the camera. And then they didn't call back and she thought they'd forgotten about her. a year plus goes by and she finds herself in a relationship that's when VH1 called.
They wanted her for a slot on their dating show except now they had their premise. Dating Naked. She had NOT agreed to appear naked on camera and she was in a committed relationship now so she tried to back out but she was told if she did then she would be sued for breach of contract. So she agreed to be on the show with her partner's blessing.
Now the show did blur out the nudity but the things in her contract stipulated that she do certain things for the camera such as kissing, making out, do the actual date, have actual chemistry etc. It was made clear to her that she could refuse to do any of these things and they would stop filming, however if that was the case she would have to repay for her flights and hotels out to the shoot and back and she couldn't afford that so she went along with it.
The guy she was paired with was very handsy. He kept trying to pull her in for a kiss and then when she finally let him kiss her because of contractual obligations he tried to grope her bare breasts while they kissed and then he grabbed her by the backside and pulled her closed enough she could feel his erection against her genitals.
Then the actual date started and it was decided by production that they would have a beach picnic date. after Lunch she had to get into the water with him where he insisted on wrestling with her as an excuse for more groping.
She said that after production wrapped she felt violated and dirty. She went to her hotel room and cried. Her date was in the next room and kept knocking on the door wanting to "hang out" and see more of her and that just made her feel trapped. She was afraid to open the door even to go to the airport and go home because she was afraid he'd be there and try something more.
She got home and a few months go by when her episode airs. For whatever reason she decided to watch it. She discovered that production wasn't done allowing her to be violated yet. During the scene where she was wrestling with the guy in the water there were several seconds where they didn't bother pixelating her genitalia. And now it was on national TV for anyone to see.
In the aftermath she was fired from her job, her BF left her because the way the show edited the footage made it look like she was willfully and wantingly cheating on him with the creeper, and several of her friends stopped returning calls. She attempted to sue but lost Production pointed out that she had signed several contracts and in one of them she had agreed to be filmed naked and that they could air that footage as they saw fit without any restriction. Furthermore if she did sue she would be in violation of those contracts and that she would be liable for the legal fees. Due to the contracts the case was dismissed.

462

https://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/nqjxe8/people_who_have_appeared_on_dating_shows_naked/
[2021-06-03 Thu 01:30]

usenet has all the media | how to

AC@Phelps> Also, the magic codephrase for complete media freedom is “VPN Sonarr SABNZBD Plex”. You’ll need an account to a usenet server. It’s some work, and you need to be at least “I can run my own minecraft server” savy, but beyond that, there’s plenty of info on yandex to get you going.
[2021-06-04 Fri 09:30]

answering HN re lab leak "racist"

"lab leak" theory considered racist because implied CCP malice | HN

chickenmonkey 2 hours ago [–]

The idea of a lab leak could either mean that legitimate research was happening on this virus and it got accidentally leaked, or that the virus was being prepared as a bio-weapon and was intentionally or unintentionally released. The reason I think those scientists disavowed the lab leak theory initially was to avoid confusion between whether COVID-19 was an intentional bio-attack by China as many believed then and was pushed by Trump.

I reply | CCP bioattack not racist

And it's racist to suppose the CCP made a deliberate "unrestricted biowarfare" attack?

Is it also racist to assert that the USA made two totally unnecessary nuclear attacks on Japanese civilian cities while Japan desperately tried to surrender?

The CCP certainly views itself as sufficiently aggrieved by US provocations to launch a bioweapon attack on the USA. I've read that the PLA believes multiple Chinese epidemics such as SARS and Swine Flu were actually US biowarfare attacks. Furthermore, the USA is arguably fomenting revolution within multiple Chinese territories. Trying to divide China into warring states is, like, the worst thing you can do, from their perspective, because it causes "interesting times".

"Oh that's racist, the heirs of the Mongol Empire wouldn't counterattack Europeans."

I'm flabbergasted that is the argument. It's not racist. It's merely disruptive to Fauci's collegial relations with his Chinese counterparts, and to the MSM's advertising revenue.

There are no brownie points for failure to anticipate WW3. What's racist is refusing to take the furious PLA's grievances seriously. I thought WW2 ended the notion that yellow men can't fight?

This reminds me too much of how Roosevelt cynically cornered Japan into attacking Pearl Harbor, much to the shock and righteous fury of clueless Americans.

second draft

Oh, so the idea that it was an intentional bio-attack is what's "racist".

Why? Xi and the top leadership of the CCP/PLA are not a race, they're an oligarchy, maybe monarchy.

They receive many benefits from a pandemic, such as cover to crack down on rebellion in Hong Kong, a counter to Western propaganda for open societies, an excuse for economic recession.

I've read that the PLA believes that plagues such as SARS and Swine Flu are actually US bioweapons. That would make COVID19 merely symmetrical retaliation. The PLA also believes the USA is fomenting dissent and rebellion in China's territory to divide her. This is casus belli.

The US oligarchy cynically cornered Japan into attacking Pearl Harbor and ultimately nuked two Japanese cities while Japan tried to surrender. The USA also firebombed Dresden, a refugee city. Are these facts racist?

If you insist that the idea of China making an unrestricted biowarfare attack is so unprovoked and irrational that the mere thought is motivated purely by racial bigotry, then guess what? If it turns out the PLA really is guilty, you have condemned China as the wholly evil side. Shall we declare a second Pearl Harbor and demand unconditional surrender?

I certainly won't enlist for that war. I suspect China would happily leave the USA alone if the USA returned the favor. The Pacific is wide and deep.
[2021-06-04 Fri 13:32]

Majority Of Americans Believe COVID Came From Wuhan Lab; A Quarter Believe It Was "Released On Purpose", New Poll Finds | ZeroHedge News

https://www.zerohedge.com/covid-19/majority-americans-believe-covid-came-wuhan-lab-quarter-believe-it-was-released-purpose
[2021-06-05 Sat 13:37]

Putin Charges US With Using Dollar To Wage "Economic & Political War" | ZeroHedge News

https://www.zerohedge.com/economics/putin-charges-us-using-dollar-wage-economic-political-war
[2021-06-05 Sat 13:38]

[Infographics] Two of the most useful principal component analyses (PCAs) worth saving | thuletide.wordpress.com

[Infographics] Two of the most useful principal component analyses (PCAs) worth saving
August 8, 2020

The two principal component analyses below are the most useful and straightforward that I’ve ever come across. They’re very easy to understand for normal people who don’t know anything about genetics. The first is a PCA of the entire human species, and the second only features Caucasoids (aka West Eurasians). I made them into infographic type images with sauces, maybe you find use for them somehow.

https://thuletide.wordpress.com/2021/06/04/infographics-two-of-the-most-useful-principal-component-analyses-pcas-worth-saving/
[2021-06-05 Sat 16:32]

answering Textmind questions

How do you differentiate the meta-outline and Textmind?

Meta-outline is the files. It doesn't include the Textmind algorithm, software, website, etc.

3-Persinter, as a tool for storing multi-categorical information seems to duplicate the function of cascade sorting. How do you reconcile?

If you try to do strict cascade sorting, you'll soon experience frustration. Some very important bits will get inappropriately buried. Some ambiguous bits will get confusingly filed. Persinter solves both problems.

Often it's a temporary storage location where current multi-categorical considerations can develop safely, without being chopped to bits and scattered prematurely. Do the butchery later, as a refresher and to ensure future retrieval.

What is far deadlier than most people realize? [serious] | reddit | leg blood clots | weirs

What is far deadlier than most people realize? [serious]
https://www.reddit.com/r/AskReddit/comments/nt3y49/what_is_far_deadlier_than_most_people_realize/

tjfergusen
20 hours ago

Trucker here. I've had two blood clots in my legs from driving long distances and having my leg pressed against the corner of the seat for hours on end. One almost killed me. Apparently it's very common with truckers. You're supposed to stop and walk around every hour and a half to keep things circulating (which almost nobody does due to time constraints).
The same thing happens in gaming chairs apparently - people forget to move their legs because they're so focused on the game. You don't need to worry so much if you're younger, but if you're a gamer who's a little older, please be aware.

16.1k

Deepimpact1234
14 hours ago

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a well documented effect of long haul flights too. Which is why pilots who fly long haul and ultra long haul (flights lasting more than 10 hrs) wear pressure socks. Passengers are advised to walk around the cabin once every few hours. With flights lasting up to 18 hours, this is a necessity. Get the blood moving. If any of these clots somehow dislodge and reach your heart, it is goodbye.

CircleBox2
20 hours ago

Testicular torsion - don't be embarrassed to ask for help. In ALL honesty, the embarrassment is ALL IN YOUR HEAD. Doctors & nurses REALLY don't give a fuck, they really don't care, and aren't judging you one bit. They have seen EVERYTHING, and then some more. But they WILL judge you if you make the foolish decision not to seek help coz of made-up embarrassment and lose your balls.
The pain might not be severe, but you have a few hours tops before your balls die.

Kulladar
22 hours ago

Weirs
It's amazing how many people play around them or swim just upstream of them.
Almost no one knows the bottom of them is a death trap of rotating undercurrent and almost no one knows how to escape one if you do get stuck in it. Even if you do know how to get out you'll have a hell of a time of it. If a kid gets stuck in one they're as good as dead, as is anyone who goes in to save them.
Very few actually have warnings around them.
If you unluckily get trapped in one try to swim down to the bottom and swim/claw your way downstream along the bottom a ways and then swim up to the surface.

They're called low head dams or run of the river dams in some parts of the world.
Sometimes warning signs for them will just say DAM. Keep in mind this danger is present anytime water is flowing shallow and fast over the top of something into deeper water at an angle. Even a large rock or fallen tree that has water running over it can create the same underwater trap.

6.9k

bobcatfisher
16 hours ago

Got caught in one as a preteen. I was downstream of it where the water was only about 2.5ft deep and decided to walk up to it and climb it. Once I got close my footing just dropped out from under me because it had eroded to be about 6-8 ft deep there and I got tumbled underwater until I managed to kick off the bottom of the damn thing far enough towards where the water would push me downstream instead of sucking me back in. I remember coughing up some water and throwing up some water in the shallows below it and being near to exhausted to drag myself to shore. I still can’t believe they don’t post more warnings or rope these death traps off.
Fuck teaching children about quicksand, teach kids about these forms of population control littering rivers and streams.
Oh yeah, this was an incredibly small one too. If it had been any deeper or bigger I definitely would’ve died.

[2021-06-07 Mon 07:35]

US senate envoy arrives in Taiwan | Reddit | [2021-06-08 Tue]

The US senate envoy has arrived in Taiwan on an US Air Force C-17 at Songshan International Airport
https://www.reddit.com/r/taiwan/comments/nt91j8/the_us_senate_envoy_has_arrived_in_taiwan_on_an/
[2021-06-07 Mon 07:35]

UFOs | jackals skulking | seeking our legal consent

Unidentified Floating Objects reported off the coast, says canoe guard.

"It had giant white spirit trees in a wooden bowl, and was in the deep water. At first it seemed small but then it grew to huge size," said Running Duck.

"Probably nothing," local shaman Sacred Turtle commented. "Just a young cloud spirit visiting with Mother Ocean."

Chief Squatting Bear agreed, "The proper sacrifices had all been made this year. A spot of odd weather is nothing to worry about."

-—

They've been observing us a long time, and now they insist on being noticed. That means they'll want to talk soon, after their identity is known and accepted. What changed? Well, humanity is now sufficiently space-aware to understand the concept of aliens. Informed consent is legally valid.

During the colonization of North America, European colonies were initially apt to be wiped out by either British navy or Spanish infantry. Nascent colonies are extremely vulnerable to state militaries. Hence why the UFOs remain nomadic.

It's not an invasion. They're afraid of the Overwatcher. Therefore they need our permission in order to do something. Presumably it involves glass beads, Manhattan Island and the UN.

Given how the UFOs are restricted to skulking like jackals in lion territory, I'd say it's a bad idea to join the jackal's side. But I'm sure they'll have some very compelling glass beads.
[2021-06-07 Mon 10:20]

answering textmind questions

1st round

What exactly is the OODA loop of Cyborganize? Is it essentially Daily Routine > (add things to agenda) > Do Agenda item > Also do refiling & etc relating to task?

Isn't the whole thing an OODA loop? What part of it isn't?
[2021-06-07 Mon 10:22]

he wrote

liblung — Today at 10:25 AM
T3s are created through "hey, this thought is very more-than-the-sum-of-its-parts. I'll retain it over here." What then creates T2's?(edited)
[10:26 AM]
Specifically, some parts are clearer to me than others in how you do them "flow" wise. I assume they all have the flow, but my understanding varies.
[10:31 AM]
What prompts clearing out 3-Persinter and generally updating things? The user's contact with the directory as a result of ramblog atomization?

liblung — Today at 10:57 AM
Specifically, what conditions don't fall under "aimless sorting" when regarding cleanup / refactoring. I'm guessing this can be solved by saying "I'm doing it to clean up the important spot".

my reply

T3s are created through "hey, this thought is very more-than-the-sum-of-its-parts. I'll retain it over here." What then creates T2's?

Once you have a pile of disorganized T3s, it's an overlapping mess. Throw them into a hierarchical T2 site. Organize the prose by a rational tree. This lets you flexibly develop content without getting lost in tag and namespace maintenance.

Once the tree starts bulging at the seams due to the topic becoming more web-like as it fills out, then it's time for a T1 wiki.

Specifically, some parts are clearer to me than others in how you do them "flow" wise. I assume they all have the flow, but my understanding varies.

Makes sense, so ask about the specific parts.

What prompts clearing out 3-Persinter and generally updating things? The user's contact with the directory as a result of ramblog atomization?

What is ramblog atomization?

Clear out persinter when you need to. If you're trying to think in a high-level way, and there's a bunch of obsolete stuff in the way, then clear that out. It'll be a great refresher that clarifies your next round of strategic thinking.

I try to delay those grand reorientations and stay as focused as possible, because a tighter reorientation is easier and yields better results. Often it's better to leave a question open that to force a bad resolution.

As a result, persinter builds up a lot of high-level intuition and key insights. It's a good feeling to have that there, because you can see the wisdom behind your current direction.

Specifically, what conditions don't fall under "aimless sorting" when regarding cleanup / refactoring. I'm guessing this can be solved by saying "I'm doing it to clean up the important spot".

I would rather have a ridiculous chain of "resorting x to resort y to z to a b c d e…" that I track in '3dashboard than to sort aimlessly. Or at least a broad topic. I can't recall the last time I truly sorted aimlessly in my main Textmind. I want to say it's been year(s). At my scale, I suspect it would do more harm than good.

When sorting, there's always the risk of getting some dumbass notion and breaking a bunch of things. At least when one sorts for a purpose, the mistake and repairs are a useful refresher on the relevant topic. Aimless sorting just creates a mess for no reason. The overwhelming ambiguity and low productivity are depressing. It's ok for small trees such as new Textminds or trees with narrow scope such as Textminis, but don't do it on big general Textminds. You'll run straight into the major organic brain limitations Textmind was built to fix.
[2021-06-07 Mon 11:44]

Publish and Perish (erikhoel.substack.com) | HN@ | careerist scientistry auto-corrupted

Publish and Perish (erikhoel.substack.com)
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=27412122

ProjectArcturis 17 hours ago [–]

I used to work in one of the top fMRI labs. The comments about The Science Game are spot on. The vast majority of scientists, by the time they're midway through their postdocs, just want to do whatever research will get them a professorship and some grants. Actual knowledge generation is a distant second to keeping the ball bouncing by getting out papers and getting in grants.

ProjectArcturis 17 hours ago [–]

Just want to add, it's generally not a conscious choice. Everyone wants to do something that is both a genius experiment and gets published in Nature. The Science Game gets propagated in how scientists conceive and plan their work. Everything must be done in the paradigm of publications and grants. You can't do anything if it doesn't have at least interim results within a year or two. It's an unfathomable career risk to try something absolutely brand new. There's a good chance it fails, at which point you have a 2 year blank spot in your CV and you can never get back in the top 10% of scientists where you need to be to get R01 funding and run your own lab.

[2021-06-07 Mon 15:30]

answering cyberthal questions on discord

he wrote

liblung — Today at 1:43 AM
It's difficult to find the difference between things that I am supposed to do out of intuitive disgust at it not being proper, and things that I am not.(edited)

liblung — Today at 4:45 AM
I suppose that I'm asking is, of these three loops:

  • daylog processing
  • executive refactoring
  • journal reviewing

How does executive refactoring cover places where it doesn't seem "executive" as opposed to a natural response (IE, persinter obsolete info, let's clean it up)? Are "unwritten objectives" a legal move?(edited)

liblung — Today at 5:17 AM
A similar question: Is there a "minimum effort for task logging"? Frequently with more trivial tasks I find myself just doing them rather than writing down. I vaguely suspect this is a bad practice.

my reply

It's difficult to find the difference between things that I am supposed to do out of intuitive disgust at it not being proper, and things that I am not.

Making mistakes is an unavoidable part of developing Cyborganize intuition.

I suppose that I'm asking is, of these three loops:

  • daylog processing
  • executive refactoring
  • journal reviewing

How does executive refactoring cover places where it doesn't seem "executive" as opposed to a natural response (IE, persinter obsolete info, let's clean it up)? Are "unwritten objectives" a legal move?(edited)

If you really feel it's necessary to clean up persinter, despite the current task not depending on it, then you can write a task to do so. Make the task as specific as possible, to limit the scope. For example, "process persint to clarify which career I should choose." Which implies the parent task, "choose a career."

The only time I generate a sorting cleanup task like this, is when I can't trust the sorting process, because something is broken in the tree structure, in a way that is obscured. Then I write a task to fix that.

Those kind of tree structure problems sometimes occurred for me when I was still deciding 10-Bins, but the last time I had one was months or years ago. A young Textmind can expect such problems, as the user's immature namespace develops.

A novice user must do what's necessary to keep his developing Textmind functional. Beyond that, he should strive to resist the temptation to "fix problems" in his 10-Bins meta-outline. Cyborganize wants to execute the critical path as lazily as possible. Therefore, sorting extraneous to the critical path is forbidden.

The old, inefficient, human way of thinking is to worry about all the myriad ambiguities of life, distracting from executing the current task. Cyborganize remembers perfectly, so there is no need for obsessive repetition. Cyborganize forbids distraction, because executing the critical path will reveal plenty of ambiguity which must be resolved, and yield lots of feedback that obsoletes prior concerns. Therefore the goal is iterational velocity, and cognition must be streamlined, like a hawk soaring the noosphere.

A similar question: Is there a "minimum effort for task logging"? Frequently with more trivial tasks I find myself just doing them rather than writing down. I vaguely suspect this is a bad practice.

The goal is critical path execution. Ceteris paribus, doing without writing is more efficient. In practice, there are often nonobvious benefits to planning tasks and logging behavior. Feel free to experiment. I err towards capturing everything because an empty mind performs better, but what is "everything"? Obviously this is subjective intuition. I suppose anything that makes it into mental monologue is a candidate for inclusion. That leaves more bandwidth for meditation while doing.

I always log brushing my teeth, and usually task sequence it, but may spontaneously do it out of order. I rarely log drinking and urination.

Much depends on how often one is at a home keyboard, obviously.
[2021-06-08 Tue 13:32]

Fauci emails reveal a lot of tin-hat conspiracies weren’t so debunked after all | axisofeasy.com | good overview

Fauci emails reveal a lot of tin-hat conspiracies weren’t so debunked after all

Washington Post and Buzzfeed managed to get over 3,000 pages of Anthony Fauci emails released under the Freedom of Information Act and the mainstream media among others are in full damage control mode (Judicial Watch has been fighting this FOIA battle for nearly a year, Fauci’s team simply ignored early FOIA requests).

The emails, albeit heavily redacted, reveal that several themes which were dismissed by the media as “debunked conspiracy theory”, and that would get you deplatformed from Big Tech platforms for even talking about, were actually being talked about behind the scenes.

From my own admittedly cursory greps through the file, I note that multiple researchers were forwarding Fauci clinical studies about the possible use of Ivermectin, hydroxychloroquine and others, like Sorosbuvir in combatting COVID-19 in Febuary and early March 2020, before Fauci, in a press conference with Trump on March 2020 responded to a question from ABC’s John Roberts that all reports of the efficacy of these drugs were “purely anecdotal.”

It has been remarkable how the tune has changed among the mainstream media even before the Fauci emails dropped.

Last week Canada’s National Post ran a story titled:

The (Very Strong) Case For Covid-19 Leaking from a Chinese Lab
With the sub-title: If it wasn't a lab leak, the fact that a novel coronavirus just happened to emerge in Wuhan would be one of history's greatest coincidences.

Although in Feb 2020 they categorically ruled it out citing an expert Trevor Bedford. We can’t really tell if they actually talked to Bedford or simply cobbled the story from a Twitter thread.

It really is inexcusable how wrong the mainstream media got nearly everything about COVID-19 wrong, and how Big Tech was complicit in enforcing their politically motivated, anti-journalistic editorializing. Hence my obsession with it.

But just consider, it's like this for everything not just COVID. Maybe it's for the better in the long run because more people see this now than ever before. Noam Chomsky must be thrilled because his entire life's work just got publicly validated over the last year.

Read: https://www.msn.com/en-in/news/other/explained-how-anthony-fauci-s-emails-have-reignited-covid-19-wuhan-lab-leak-theory/ar-AAKMCKy

The emails: https://assets.documentcloud.org/documents/20793561/leopold-nih-foia-anthony-fauci-emails.pdf

– Mark Jeftovic
https://axisofeasy.com/aoe/axisofeasy-199-welcome-to-canada-where-debate-on-freedom-of-speech-is-officially-banned/
[2021-06-09 Wed 09:28]

Superhistory, Not Superintelligence | Artificial Intelligence is really Artificial Time | Venkatesh Rao | my notes

Superhistory, Not Superintelligence
Artificial Intelligence is really Artificial Time

Venkatesh Rao
May 12

An idea from the influential 2009 Google paper, The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Data, has shaped a lot of thinking, including my own, in the last decade: simple algorithms and more data beat complex algorithms and less data.

This insight has shaped the evolution of not one but two technological revolutions – Big Data and modern machine learning (deep learning). And it has led me to start thinking about AI in terms of time rather than intelligence.

Specifically, modern AI is better understood as AT — “Artificial Time” that can be prosthetically attached to human minds. And highly capable computing systems are best understood as existing in superhistory rather than embodying superintelligence. I think this is genuinely an interesting shift in perspective, not just a fun bit of idle speculation for time nerds like me.

The idea will take a bit of setup to explain though.

More Data

Big Data was driven by the falling costs of storage. George Dyson defined it as: It's Big Data when it’s cheaper to store it than decide what to do with it.

And we’re figuring out how to attach all this logged Artificial Time to our own brains, and learning to act like Ancient Gods ourselves.

Every time you Google something that your grandmother would have just resigned herself to simply never knowing, you are data-aging by minutes in seconds.

It’s not just the isolated factoid you learn. It’s the training and experience pathway that led to that factoid existing at your fingertips. A pathway that increasingly does not wind its way through a tradition of human minds limited by egoistic modes of cultural production, preservation, and transmission, but is limited only by storage and computation costs.

You’re not living as a witness to the rise of superintelligence. You’re living as an agent being augmented by supertime. You are living at the end of history, and entering a superhistory being created by machines.

https://breakingsmart.substack.com/p/superhistory-not-superintelligence
[2021-06-09 Wed 10:33]

my notes

I've always been annoyed at how people don't understand the enormous computation time invested into the evolution of even single-cellular life. That's why I say that humanity won't survive bacterial AI. It's also why superficial comparisons of modern AI complexity vs life-forms vastly overestimate the "intelligence" of AI, which isn't even as smart as virii.

Textmind certainly leverages quantity with simple algorithm to produce extraordinary quality.
Dbmind will too.
[2021-06-09 Wed 10:33]

why UFOs making contact | legal consent

What you're missing is that they've been increasingly swarming USMIL recently. This increased activity is one of the reasons for disclosure. Source – Elizondo.

Why make public contact with humanity? Most likely, to obtain legal consent, as judged by the Overwatcher. The goal is to obtain human indigenous rights.
[2021-06-09 Wed 10:48]

WATCH: Explosive, Unearthed Video Shows Peter Daszak Describing ‘Chinese Colleagues’ Developing ‘Killer’ Coronaviruses. | thenationalpulse.com

WATCH: Explosive, Unearthed Video Shows Peter Daszak Describing ‘Chinese Colleagues’ Developing ‘Killer’ Coronaviruses.

EcoHealth Alliance President Peter Daszak – who collaborated with the Wuhan Institute of Virology on research funded by Dr. Anthony Fauci’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease – appears to boast about the manipulation of “killer” SARS-like coronaviruses carried out by his “colleagues in China” in a clip unearthed by The National Pulse.

Daszak made the admission at a 2016 forum discussing “emerging infectious diseases and the next pandemic,” which appears to be at odds with Fauci’s repeated denial of funding gain-of-function research at the Wuhan Institute of Virology.

While describing how his organization sequences deadly viruses, Daszak describes the process of “insert[ing] spike proteins” into viruses to see if they can “bind to human cells” as being carried out by his “colleagues in China”:

“Then when you get a sequence of a virus, and it looks like a relative of a known nasty pathogen, just like we did with SARS. We found other coronaviruses in bats, a whole host of them, some of them looked very similar to SARS. So we sequenced the spike protein: the protein that attaches to cells. Then we… Well I didn’t do this work, but my colleagues in China did the work. You create pseudo particles, you insert the spike proteins from those viruses, see if they bind to human cells. At each step of this you move closer and closer to this virus could really become pathogenic in people.

“You end up with a small number of viruses that really do look like killers,” he adds.

The comments follow growing evidence that Fauci’s NIAID has deep financial and personnel ties to the Wuhan Institute of Virology – and that Daszak’s EcoHealth alliance was one of the primary proxies funneling the money to the Chinese Communist Party lab.

MUST READ: EXC: BLM Founder Invokes Mao In Unseen, Pro-Communism Speech.

Over a dozen research papers carried out under a $3.7 million National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease (NIAID) grant list the Wuhan Lab’s Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases Director Shi Zhengli as a co-author alongside Daszak. Shi has included these Fauci-backed grants on her resume.

The Wuhan lab has also listed the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as one of its “partners,” secretly erasing the mention in March 2021.

https://thenationalpulse.com/exclusive/daszak-reveals-chinese-colleagues-manipulating-coronaviruses/
[2021-06-09 Wed 11:05]

HN | VPNs log | jurisdictional arbitrage

Australian Federal Police and FBI nab underworld figures using encrypted app (abc.net.au)
409 points by ferros 23 hours ago | hide | past | favorite | 323 comments
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=27430508

wallaBBB 16 hours ago [–]

One of the (publicly unspoken) conditions to offer VPN services in western countries is to keep logs and provide on their request, regardless of the marketing stories. There are several verifiable cases where Nord has cooperated with FBI and Interpol and provided logs, but this is a fairly small lie, compared to the time when they tried to keep quiet about a breach.
Not saying that having a VPN service from Russia or China is a better solution…

ocdtrekkie 13 hours ago [–]

Generally speaking, they all have to have relatively short term logs to operate and protect their services. This tends to defeat things like piracy, where commercial actors need time to file paperwork and get subpoenas, by which time the logs are gone, but obviously the feds can move a lot faster and tend to get what they need to catch serious criminal activity.
This would, to me, suggest VPN services are a general societal good, as they prohibit annoying corporate IP enforcement behaviors, while not meaningfully helping pedophiles and terrorists.

[2021-06-09 Wed 11:57]

org-super-links | textmind candidate | defer

org-super-links
https://github.com/toshism/org-super-links

Interesting candidate. Adds backlinks to org links. Uses properties drawer.

Could get messy as links and targets morph.

Still under development.

Put it on the roadmap.
[2021-06-09 Wed 12:38]

Meet the World’s Biggest ‘Bulletproof’ Hoster | krebsonsecurity.com | Yalishanda, Ukrainian cybercriminal | USSR + China harbors darkweb

Meet the World’s Biggest ‘Bulletproof’ Hoster

For at least the past decade, a computer crook variously known as “Yalishanda,” “Downlow” and “Stasvl” has run one of the most popular “bulletproof” Web hosting services catering to a vast array of phishing sites, cybercrime forums and malware download servers. What follows are a series of clues that point to the likely real-life identity of a Russian man who appears responsible for enabling a ridiculous amount of cybercriminal activity on the Internet today.

Image: Intel471
KrebsOnSecurity began this research after reading a new academic paper on the challenges involved in dismantling or disrupting bulletproof hosting services, which are so called because they can be depended upon to ignore abuse complaints and subpoenas from law enforcement organizations. We’ll get to that paper in a moment, but for now I mention it because it prompted me to check and see if one of the more infamous bulletproof hosters from a decade ago was still in operation.

Sure enough, I found that Yalishanda was actively advertising on cybercrime forums, and that his infrastructure was being used to host hundreds of dodgy sites. Those include a large number of cybercrime forums and stolen credit card shops, ransomware download sites, Magecart-related infrastructure, and a metric boatload of phishing Web sites mimicking dozens of retailers, banks and various government Web site portals.

I first encountered Yalishanda back in 2010, after writing about “Fizot,” the nickname used by another miscreant who helped customers anonymize their cybercrime traffic by routing it through a global network of Microsoft Windows computers infected with a powerful malware strain called TDSS.

After that Fizot story got picked up internationally, KrebsOnSecurity heard from a source who suggested that Yalishanda and Fizot shared some of the same infrastructure.

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2019/07/meet-the-worlds-biggest-bulletproof-hoster/
[2021-06-10 Thu 14:41]

Publish At: Author:Cyberthal

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